Non-Compete Agreements in California

With the proliferation of wineries in California, it’s not uncommon for an owner to find one of its winemakers deciding to leave and set up shop on their own. Is there anything you can do up front to prevent them from taking the craft they’ve honed at your winery elsewhere? The short answer is, in most cases, no. But as with almost everything in the law, there are some exceptions you should know. California public policy strongly favors free and open competition in the marketplace. Business and Professions Code section 16600 states clearly that contractual restraints on competition or trade are void, except as otherwise provided. California courts interpreting this statute emphasize that it protects the right of Californians to pursue any business, occupation, or lawful employment of their choosing. Contract provisions which attempt to place restrictions on a person’s ability to work for a competitor, or open a competing enterprise, are generally unenforceable. That said, you should be aware of the “as otherwise provided” part of the Code. The primary exceptions to the prohibition on non-compete agreements apply to “owners” of a business and arise in the following contexts. First, if you are selling all of your ownership interest, or all of most of the operating assets together with the goodwill of the business, you can agree…

Murphy Campbell, So you won your case, now what Murphy, Campbell, Alliston & Quinn

So You Won Your Case…Now What?

We tend to think of winning a case and securing a judgment as the end of the legal process. Until faced with attempting to collect on a judgment, we rarely consider the process of how one actually collects such money. Imagine you fought a long, hard battle to secure a civil money judgment. The time for appeal has passed and your judgment is final. How do you get your money? It can often be difficult to get the losing party to part with their money, even in the face of a final judgment ordering them to pay. The battle to recover money that is rightfully yours can be an even longer and more arduous process than winning the judgment itself and, at the end of the day, a judgment is nothing without the ability to enforce it. Luckily, collecting a judgment can be made less daunting by understanding the processes by which it is done. The following is a brief description of how to determine what property a judgment debtor has and how different types of property can be reached to satisfy a money judgment. This article does not discuss the exemptions to property that can be reached to satisfy a judgment.  Suffice it to say for these purposes that there are certain types of…