From Breast Milk to Salary History: San Francisco Reminds Us that Employment Law in California Varies County to County

San Francisco is known for mission burritos, the golden gate bridge, and some of the most progressive employment laws in the nation. That last point was proven twice over in recent months as Mayor Ed Lee signed two ordinances. The first sets forth requirements for employer-provided lactation locations at the work site. The second goes above and beyond the California Equal Pay Act in prohibiting employers from asking about and using employees’ salary history. Lactation in the Workplace Ordinance Employers in the City and County of San Francisco already had an obligation under California law to ensure that every employee seeking to pump breast milk at the workplace has a reasonable time and place to pump. Effective January 1, 2018, San Francisco will take that requirement a step further and will require employers to ensure the pumping location is: (1) safe, clean, and free of toxic or hazardous materials, (2) has a surface for placing a breast pump and personal items onto, (3) has seating, and (4) access to electricity. Further, employees must have access to a refrigerator and sink in “close proximity to the employee’s work area.” The ordinance does have an express exemption when the employer shows that the requirements would “impose an undue hardship by causing the employer significant expense or operational…

murphy campbell, the resurgence of the zombie foreclosure Murphy, Campbell, Alliston & Quinn

“Hoooommmeeessss”: The Resurgence of the Zombie Foreclosure

If you want to write a blockbuster movie or a catchy song, zombies are great.  If you want to protect your credit, they aren’t. Upon receiving a notice of foreclosure, some homeowners move out, assuming the lender will simply take over the property. Unfortunately for these homeowners, in some cases the foreclosure process is not completed.  In the meantime, the property is left vacant and often falls into disrepair or is occupied by squatters. Since the foreclosure was never completed, title remains in the homeowner’s name. This situation is referred to as a “zombie foreclosure” and it can lead to devastating results for the homeowner. While the number of zombie foreclosures has decreased in recent years, it is a situation that still plagues homeowners. In the past year, there has been a resurgence of zombie foreclosures in California. When a home is left unattended, visible signs of distress will appear, causing the value of the property itself, and the surrounding properties, to decrease, making it even more difficult to complete the foreclosure and thus perpetuating the housing crisis. Some of the consequences for those bitten by a zombie foreclosure include liability for unpaid property taxes, homeowners association assessments, fines for failing to comply with housing codes or other ordinances, and local government bills for repairs,…