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The EEOC’s Performance Report is a Cautionary Tale for Employers

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) just released its performance report for the 2017 fiscal year. The big take away is that while the EEOC has whittled down its inventory of unresolved charges to the lowest level in 10 years, there were still over 84,000 new charges filed from nearly 700,000 calls and complaints. Additionally, with a lower inventory of unresolved charges, it appears the EEOC has been able to invest more resources in turning charges into lawsuits. The EEOC filed 184 lawsuits, more than double the number of suits filed in the previous fiscal year. All told the EEOC recovered nearly half a billion dollars from workplace discrimination claims. As the saying goes an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, so feel free to contact our friendly employment law attorneys for best practices on how to protect your business.

Ninth Circuit Affirms Summary Judgment for BNSF Railway Company in FEHA Case

BNSF Railway Company recently obtained a decisive victory in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, with the Court affirming a grant of summary judgment in its favor on an employee’s FEHA claim. The case, Alamillo v. BNSF Railway Co., was decided August 25, 2017, and underscores the importance of the three-step burden-shifting analysis for employment discrimination cases set forth by the Supreme Court in McDonnel Douglas Corp. v. Green.  In Alamillo, not only was the plaintiff unable to establish a prima facie case of discrimination, the court found that even if he had been able to do so he had presented no evidence that the employer’s stated non-discriminatory reasons for its employment actions were pretextual.   The case is interesting because Alamillo, an “extra board” or on-call locomotive engineer, was subjected to discipline for missing calls to work before he obtained a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea, which he then claimed explained his failure to hear and answer his employer’s calls to his cell phone. The district court granted summary judgment to BNSF, concluding that BNSF could not have discriminated against Alamillo based on his disability at a time when Alamillo had no diagnosis. The Ninth Circuit agreed, pointing out that the FEHA prohibits employers from taking adverse employment actions against an employee because of…