Two kings playing chess with the text, I'm glad we settled our conflict this way. War is expensive Murphy, Campbell, Alliston & Quinn

Fighting Fair: The Benefits of Alternative Dispute Resolution

In nearly every litigated case there is a benefit to engaging in early alternative dispute resolution (“ADR”). Although there may be some tactical advantages of delaying the scheduling of a mediation session, such as the filing of a dispositive motion to make unreasonable offers more narrowly tailored to the facts of the case, in the end you may find yourself at the edge of the cliff with limited resources before you even reach the courthouse steps. Many clients embarking on the battle that is litigation find that costs surmount quickly and energy is rapidly drained. This article attempts to describe the several types of alternative dispute resolution to be considered at the onset your case. Although many people conceive ADR to be a new age concept its roots are ancient, with commercial arbitration agreements dating back to Phoenician and Greek Traders. (See Kellor, F., American Arbitration: Its History, Functions, and Achievements, 3 (Port Washington, N.Y.: Kennikat Press 1948).) In the United States, ADR predates both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.  The right to privately settle claims outside of the courtroom was known in the time of our forefathers, but it was not until 1922 that ADR became institutionalized in the United States. Presently, clients are faced with a plethora of choices for ADR.…

Sledding is Not Child’s Play Anymore: Public Agencies Balance the Risk of Litigation, Murphy Campbell a Sacramento law firm

Sledding is Not Child’s Play Anymore: Public Agencies Balance the Risk of Litigation

The fear of litigation is causing some public agencies to prohibit activities which were once considered a normal part of childhood play. On January 7, 2015, the City Council in Dubuque, Iowa voted to ban sledding in almost all of its 50 parks. Other cities in the country have taken similar action, including: Des Moines, Iowa; Lincoln, Nebraska; Columbia City, Indiana; and various locations in New Jersey. While such actions are directly associated with child safety, often the biggest motivator for imposing such restrictions is fear of legal liability. For example, in Omaha, Nebraska, the family of a five year old was awarded $2.4 million dollars as a result of a sledding accident involving their child. In Boone, Iowa, a sledder was awarded $12 million dollars, and in Sioux City, Iowa, a sledder who crashed into a stop sign was awarded $2.8 million dollars. Those jury awards are noticed by other public agencies and their insurers. One study estimated that 20,000 children are injured per year in the USA, although most injuries are relatively minor. Avoiding litigation also has prompted various public agencies to modify playgrounds. In some areas, swing sets have been removed, such as in Cabell County, West Virginia, where a school district was confronted with two different lawsuits from the same parent…